Business cards

Track incoming emails from your business cards to measure their effectiveness.

Business cards are still important when you network and socialize. They might not be as important as they were 10 years ago, they are still relevant and must have for anyone looking to make personal and business connections. Plus, there’s something about having business cards that gives you that small feeling of accomplishments.

Have you ever considered the effectiveness of your business cards? Do people actually use them to follow up?

Well I thought about it. How do I know if they work? I can’t be asking everyone who emails me, “Where did you get my email?” I needed a way to track emails coming from my business cards without complicating things. So the solution was really easy: use a unique, simple email address for my business cards.

So I’ve created an easy email address with one of my primary domains and that’s what I use now on my personal cards; and for my business cards I do the same trick with the business domain. So every time someone follows up with me using my email address from my business card I know my business cards are not useless – they actually work.

Thanks to Google Apps, I was able to setup a filter  and a label for those incoming emails. Now, those emails are color-coded, never hit my spam box, and are marked as important.

When you reply and begin dialog the transition is seamless and people don’t notice the difference in the email as I reply with my regular email address.

Bonus tip: Your business card holder is not a magazine for an AK-47. So don’t just spray the crowd with your business cards. Be selective. Ask for a business card before offering your own.

 

  • http://www.ignitingyourlife.ca Karen Hyde

    I never thought of using a different email on my business cards to track their effectiveness. Good idea, it certainly would help to know whether or not business cards are worth the time and investment.

    I find in my job in HR it’s still very customary to pass business cards at networking events. I’m never sure how much value they provide. I often wondering if it’s not just more posturing than usefulness. Perhaps industries vary.

    I also find the longer the person has been in the working world, the more attached they are to business cards. I have them but actually prefer to exchange information that I drop immediately into my iPhone. Younger employees generally have no desire or need for business cards. I see them being phased out, although what replaces them, I’m not entirely sure yet.

    • http://viktorsblog.com/ Viktor Nagornyy

      Hi Karen,
      Thanks for commenting. I finally got a chance to sit down and reply =)
      Yes, more and more people are going away from business cards. But it’s still a good way
      to connect with people. Business card can’t die. However, smartphones are making it so easy to transfer contact information between phones that my you really do wonder if you should spend money on business cards. Check out Bump app if you have a smartphone at http://bu.mp/ I think you might find it very useful being in HR.

      Thanks.