Google SEOMany of you constantly complain about frequent Google changes. They changes, small and big, affect billions of websites and can kill a business within a month.

Those who complain are the ones that produce low quality content to generate ad revenue, to simply waste people’s time and money, trying to use a shortcut.

Rather than trying to paint Google as a scapegoat for your rocky search rankings, you should look no further than a mirror in the bathroom.

You are the one producing crap, low quality, keyword optimized content that serves no valuable purpose to the reader but to your selfish agenda of making money without putting hard work into it.

If you start writing a blog post because of a keyword, than you’re more likely to get hurt by Google changes. Begin writing blog posts with a value to your customers and readers in mind, the keyword should only help your content be found, it should never be the main focus of your content.

Are you one of those people, or do you produce valuable quality content that your visitors LOVE?

If you do, you have nothing to worry about, Google will reward you.

That is all.

Photo by toprankblog

  • http://leadmd.com Justin Gray

    I agree that most marketers talk like robots and I do love it when the rankings techniques so many have used to spoof popularity are ever waning. I will however say that google’s migration of data behind SSL’s and across subdomains is an absolute F’ing nightmare. So, I’m going to keep bitching about that one.

    • http://www.heinzmarketing.com Matt Heinz

      Well said! The only way to really drive long-term value for your customers and your blog is to produce authentically-interesting content. All of the algorithm changes that Google is making over time is simply focused on helping identify the most valuable, most relevant content.

      Write for your customers and you’re there!

      • Viktor

        Thanks for the comment Matt. Yes, especially with Google’s Hummingbird update writing for the customer is even more relevant than ever.

    • Viktor

      Hey Justin, yes Google’s blackout on the keywords will definitely throw a wrench into marketing campaigns. But, on the other hand, it will ask marketers to be more creative and find alternative ways of finding data they need. Neil Patel had a good post about this. I think we take a lot of things for granted and assume we’ll always have things we have now. Blackout on keywords is the perfect example how much control Google and other search engines have over what marketers do and their decisions.

      I think this aligns very well with their Hummingbird update, towards more semantic searches. Now, instead of thinking in terms of keywords, we need to think in terms of answers and conversations. I think in the long run it will be beneficial for both marketers/businesses and consumers searching for information.

  • http://www.heinzmarketing.com Matt Heinz

    Well said! The only way to really drive long-term value for your customers and your blog is to produce authentically-interesting content. All of the algorithm changes that Google is making over time is simply focused on helping identify the most valuable, most relevant content.

    Write for your customers and you’re there!

  • http://www.dsthree.com Jeff Weinberger

    Very well said. If you are producing content, then you clearly have an audience in mind. The **only** thing that matters is that the content you produce delivers value to that audience.

    If it does, it will rank very well in Google searches – because the searches will be done by your audience.

    Focus on value that builds relationships.

  • http://contactually.com Ouzy Mariko

    I love this post! I’m a huge proponent of writing content for the reader rather than writing for Google and keywords. Frankly, I’m glad that this update is out.

  • http://fruition.net/case-studies/ Stephanie Riggs

    There are so many people who feel irritation from the new updates and want to work calmly in straight way as duplicated contents and resubmitting it on different websites. Now all these strategies are come to an end and its time to pay attention upon the quality and uniqueness of contents. I like your efforts in this regards.

  • Spook SEO

    Viktor I have also the same opinion on this topic and those peoples are complaining that works on black hat SEO and promote bad content. The hummingbird is finest update by Google. The thing that you write on a keyword is new for me and now I should avoid writing keyword blog.

    • http://www.projectarmy.net/ Viktor Nagornyy

      Hummingbird is really what I was referring to by focusing on people not keywords. Everyone has different search intent, even when they are using the same keyword.

      For example, if the keyword is “Armageddon” – am I searching for a movie or to find our what it is? Understanding search intent will help you craft your content not only to rank well, but also to get your qualified leads – that’s the true end result we want, LEADS – not rankings.

  • Viktor

    Hey Justin, yes Google’s blackout on the keywords will definitely throw a wrench into marketing campaigns. But, on the other hand, it will ask marketers to be more creative and find alternative ways of finding data they need. Neil Patel had a good post about this. I think we take a lot of things for granted and assume we’ll always have things we have now. Blackout on keywords is the perfect example how much control Google and other search engines have over what marketers do and their decisions.

    I think this aligns very well with their Hummingbird update, towards more semantic searches. Now, instead of thinking in terms of keywords, we need to think in terms of answers and conversations. I think in the long run it will be beneficial for both marketers/businesses and consumers searching for information.